Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions

What items do I need to bring for my vaccine visit?

For Adults:

  • A Photo ID and COVID vaccination card are required for your visit. If these documents are not available at the time of visit, you will be asked to return at a later date.
  • If you lost your vaccination card it cannot be replaced with another card. However, there are several ways to obtain proof of vaccination:
    1. Contact the facility in which you received your COVID-19 vaccine(s) and ask for a printable vaccination record.
    2. Proof of vaccination may also be printed from the Kentucky Immunization Registry (KYIR). Additional details can be found online at https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dph/dehp/idb/Pages/kyir.aspx. Please allow 3-5 business days for Immunization Record requests to be fulfilled.

*** WEDCO will replace the vaccination card ONLY if the patient received their vaccines through WEDCO.*** 

 

For Children age 6 months and older:

Please bring your Driver’s License and vaccine card with you to your scheduled appointment. If you are bringing a child 17 and under please provide a birth certificate.  The child’s parent/legal guardian must be present. We will require legal documentation of guardianship/custody for those who are not listed on the birth certificate.

Now that I’ve tested positive, when or should I get vaccinated?

You should get a COVID-19 vaccine even if you already had COVID-19. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine after you recover provides added protection against COVID-19. Individuals who recently had COVID-19 may consider delaying any COVID-19 vaccines, including the updated booster dose, by 3 months from the start of their symptoms or positive test.

I've recovered from COVID-19. When should I get the influenza vaccine?

The National Institutes of Health COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel recommends that persons with COVID-19 should receive an inactivated influenza vaccine. The guidelines state that as long as influenza viruses are circulating, an unvaccinated person with COVID-19 should receive the influenza vaccine once they have substantially improved or recovered from COVID-19.

Source: https://files.covid19treatmentguidelines.nih.gov/guidelines/covid19treatmentguidelines.pdf

I’m fully vaccinated but tested positive. Do I need to isolate?

Yes. Breakthrough cases can occur among those fully vaccinated.

  • Current protocols for positive people require a minimum of 5-day isolation. If you had mild or no symptoms and are fever-free after 5 days, you can end isolation but MUST wear a mask through day 10.
  • If you had moderate or severe COVID-19 or you are immunocompromised, you should isolate through day 10.
  • If you ended isolation but your COVID-19 symptoms recur or worsen, you should restart your isolation period back to day zero. Day zero is the day of symptom onset or test date. Day 1 is the first full day after the day your symptoms started or the test date.
  • If you have a fever, continue to stay home until you have been fever-free for 24 hours without medication assistance and until your symptoms have improved.

 CDC Press Release: https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2022/p0811-covid-guidance.html

    Who should get a COVID-19 booster dose?

    On September 1, 2022, the CDC issued new recommendations for COVID-19 boosters, after the FDA authorized updated booster formulas from both Pfizer and Moderna. The CDC recommends that everyone who is eligible stay up-to-date on vaccinations by getting an updated booster dose at least 2 months after their last COVID-19 shot—either since their last booster dose or since completing their primary series. These new boosters contain an updated bivalent formula that both boosts immunity against the original coronavirus strain and protects against the newer Omicron variants that account for most of the current cases.

    Current Recommendations as of September 1, 2022:

    Children

    Updated Pfizer booster doses are authorized for individuals age 12 and older. The CDC continues to recommend that children age 5 and up get a booster dose at least 5 months after completing their primary series. For this younger age group (children 5-12), the original booster dose formula is still authorized for use. At this time, people aged 12 years to 17 years can only receive the updated Pfizer bivalent booster.

    Age Group Series Booster Recommended Time of Booster Dose
    6 Months – 4 Years 2 or 3 shot series Not at this time. 5 months
    5 – 11 Years 2 shot series Original Formula (monovalent) 5 months
    12 – 17 Years 2 shot series

    Updated Booster (Bivalent)

    *Pfizer only

    2 months

     

    Adults

    Adults 18 and older are recommended to receive one updated Pfizer or Moderna (bivalent) booster. This includes people who have received all primary series doses and people who have previously received one or more original (monovalent) boosters.

    Age Group Series Booster Recommended Time of Booster Dose
    18 Years and Older 1 or 2 shot series Updated Booster (Bivalent) 2 months
    Can I get the updated COVID-19 booster if I haven’t been vaccinated yet?

    No. The updated bivalent formula is in use only for COVID-19 booster doses, and not for initial vaccination. The best way to protect yourself from getting severely ill from COVID-19 is to get vaccinated. The CDC recommends that currently unvaccinated people get their primary series (the initial two doses of either Pfizer or Moderna, or one dose of the Novavax vaccine), and then wait at least two months to get the updated Pfizer or Moderna booster dose.

    Should I get an updated COVID-19 booster if I’ve previously gotten a booster? What if I recently had COVID-19?

    Yes, the CDC recommends that everyone age 12 and up should get an updated COVID-19 booster this fall to stay up-to-date on vaccinations. The same is true for people who completed their primary series or received one or two boosters: they should get an updated booster dose at least two months after their last shot.

    For maximum effectiveness of the updated booster dose, individuals who recently had COVID-19 may consider delaying any COVID-19 vaccination, including the updated booster dose, by 3 months from the start of their symptoms or positive test.

    Why is an additional dose of the COVID-19 vaccine recommended for immunocompromised people?
    • People with compromised immune systems may have a reduced ability to respond to vaccines, which can increase the risk of becoming severely ill from COVID-19. The CDC recommends that immunocompromised people who received the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine get an additional dose at least 28 days after their second shot. 
    • All Johnson & Johnson recipients, including immunocompromised people, should get a booster shot at least two months after their initial shot. 
    • Patients who are immunocompromised should consult with their health care provider to discuss additional precautions and any questions they have about protecting themselves from COVID-19.
    Can I mix and match my COVID-19 vaccine and booster?

    Yes. Eligible individuals can get either the Pfizer or Moderna updated booster, regardless of whether their primary series or most recent dose was with Pfizer, Moderna, Novavax, or the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. If you have questions about your eligibility for booster doses or which booster you should get, speak to your health care provider.

    What are the current recommendations for COVID-19 vaccinations for children?

    As of June 18, 2022, the CDC recommends that children and adolescents age 6 months and older get a Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, and advises children and adolescents age 5 and older who receive the Pfizer vaccine to get a booster dose at least 5 months after their second shot.

    The dose and series authorized for children is informed by clinical trials on the safety and effectiveness of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine in these age groups.

    The CDC recommends that children and adolescents age 6 months to 17 years who are moderately or severely immunocompromised should receive a three-shot series of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. For more information on COVID-19 vaccine recommendations for immunocompromised children and adolescents, follow the CDC’s guidelines here.

    **** NEW BOOSTER GUIDANCE***

    As of September 1, 2022, updated bivalent Pfizer booster doses are authorized for individuals age 12 and older. The CDC continues to recommend that children age 5 and up get a booster dose at least 5 months after completing their primary series. For this younger age group (children 5-12), the original booster dose formula is still authorized for use.

    As scientific experts at the FDA and CDC continue to review the data, updated Omicron-specific boosters could become available for younger children in the future.

    Why should children get the COVID-19 vaccine?
    • Experts from the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend that children and adolescents age 6 months and older get a COVID-19 vaccine to help protect them from catching and spreading the virus.
    • The vaccine is the best way to protect children from becoming severely ill or having long-lasting health impacts. COVID-19 has become one of the top 10 causes of pediatric death, and tens of thousands of children and teens have been hospitalized with COVID-19. While children and adolescents are typically at lower risk than adults of becoming severely ill or hospitalized from COVID-19, it is still possible.

    CDC Press Release: https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2022/s0618-children-vaccine.html

    Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for children?

    Yes. Scientists have worked to ensure the vaccine is safe for children and adolescents ages 6 months to 17 years old. Before being authorized for children, experts completed their review of safety and effectiveness data from clinical trials. What’s more, 22 million children and adolescents, ages 5-17 have already received the COVID-19 vaccine. As of June 18, the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are also authorized for children as young as 6 months.

    Can children get the COVID-19 vaccine at the same time as other vaccines?

    Yes, it is safe for children and adolescents to get a COVID-19 vaccine and other routine vaccines, including the flu shot and other routine pediatric immunizations, during the same visit. The CDC recommends that all children and adolescents age 6 months and older remain up to date with routine vaccinations, and receive the COVID-19 vaccine when eligible.

    Will children experience any side effects from the vaccine? I’ve heard about myocarditis.
    • Side effects to the COVID-19 vaccines are typically mild and resolve in one to two days — like soreness in the arm, fatigue, headaches, or a slight fever.
    • The risk of a child having a reaction to the COVID-19 vaccine is very low. One rare side effect that has been linked to the COVID-19 vaccine is myocarditis (inflammation of the heart), and data show a higher risk among younger males. However, reports of this side effect are rare. The risk of developing myocarditis after a COVID-19 infection is much higher than the risk of developing myocarditis after the vaccine. If you have questions about how to protect your children from COVID-19, about the vaccines, or about myocarditis, speak to your health care provider or pediatrician.