Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions

What items do I need to bring for my vaccine visit?

For Adults:

  • A Photo ID and COVID vaccination card are required for your visit. If these documents are not available at the time of visit, you will be asked to return at a later date.
  • If you lost your vaccination card it cannot be replaced with another card. However, there are several ways to obtain proof of vaccination:
    1. Contact the facility in which you received your COVID-19 vaccine(s) and ask for a printable vaccination record.
    2. Proof of vaccination may also be printed from the Kentucky Immunization Registry (KYIR). Additional details can be found online at https://chfs.ky.gov/agencies/dph/dehp/idb/Pages/kyir.aspx. Please allow 3-5 business days for Immunization Record requests to be fulfilled.

*** WEDCO will replace the vaccination card ONLY if the patient received their vaccines through WEDCO.*** 

 

For Children 5 and older:

Please bring your Driver’s License and vaccine card with you to your scheduled appointment. If you are bringing a child 17 and under please provide a birth certificate.  The child’s parent/legal guardian must be present. We will require legal documentation of guardianship/custody for those who are not listed on the birth certificate.

Now that I’ve tested positive, when or should I get vaccinated?

Person(s) who’ve tested positive for COVID-19 can receive their vaccination after completing their 10-day isolation AND fully recovered (no symptoms).

I’m fully vaccinated but tested positive. Do I need to isolate?

Yes. Breakthrough cases can occur among those fully vaccinated. Current protocols for positive people require a minimum of 5-days. If you have no symptoms or your symptoms are resolving after five days, you can leave your house but MUST wear a mask for an additional 5-days.

If you have a fever, continue to stay home until you have been fever-free for 24 hours without medication assistance and until your symptoms have improved.

    I've recovered from COVID-19. When should I get the influenza vaccine?

    The National Institutes of Health COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel recommends that persons with COVID-19 should receive an inactivated influenza vaccine. The guidelines state that as long as influenza viruses are circulating, an unvaccinated person with COVID-19 should receive the influenza vaccine once they have substantially improved or recovered from COVID-19.

    Source: https://files.covid19treatmentguidelines.nih.gov/guidelines/covid19treatmentguidelines.pdf

    Who should get a COVID-19 booster dose?

    The protection against disease that vaccines provide may start to wane over time. In these cases, a booster dose may be needed to boost a person’s immune response and increase protection. The COVID-19 vaccines continue to be effective in reducing the risk of severe disease, hospitalization, and death. However, scientists are starting to see reduced protection against mild and moderate disease, especially among certain populations. CDC’s latest booster guidance is in response to this waning protection and the recent emergence of the Omicron variant.

    Updated guidance as of December 10, 2021:

    Updated guidance as of January 5, 2022:

    Everyone age 12 and older is eligible to get a COVID-19 booster dose.

    • Moderna recipients age 18 and older should get a booster at least 5 months after the second shot.
    • Pfizer recipients age 12 and older should get a booster at least 5 months after the second shot.
    • Johnson & Johnson recipients age 18 and older should get a Pfizer or Moderna booster at least 2 months after the initial shot.
    • Children younger than 12: a booster is not recommended at this time.

     

    The CDC recommends that people who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine get a Pfizer or Moderna booster. The CDC advises people who got a Pfizer or Moderna vaccine to get the same booster as their initial vaccine but allows them to mix and match (i.e., get a different COVID-19 booster than their initial vaccine) depending on preference or availability—with the exception of adolescents age 12-17 who are only eligible to receive the Pfizer vaccine.

     

        Why is an additional dose of the COVID-19 vaccine recommended for immunocompromised people?
        • People with compromised immune systems may have a reduced ability to respond to vaccines, which can increase the risk of becoming severely ill from COVID-19. The CDC recommends that immunocompromised people who received the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine get an additional dose at least 28 days after their second shot. 
        • All Johnson & Johnson recipients, including immunocompromised people, should get a booster shot at least two months after their initial shot. 
        • Patients who are immunocompromised should consult with their health care provider to discuss additional precautions and any questions they have about protecting themselves from COVID-19.
        Can I mix and match my COVID-19 vaccine and booster?

        The CDC recommends people who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine get a Pfizer or Moderna booster. The CDC advises people who got a Pfizer or Moderna vaccine to get the same booster as their initial vaccine but allows them to mix and match (i.e., get a different COVID-19 booster than their initial vaccine) depending on preference or availability—with the exception of adolescents age 12-17 who are only eligible to receive the Pfizer vaccine.

        If you received the Pfizer vaccine and are 12 years of age or older, you are eligible to get a booster dose 5 months after your second shot. If you received the Moderna vaccine, you should get the booster dose 5 months after your second shot. If you received the J&J vaccine, you are eligible for a booster two months after getting the initial shot.

        If you have questions about your eligibility for booster doses or which booster you should get, speak to your health care provider.

        Why should children get the COVID-19 vaccine?
        • Experts from the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend that children and adolescents age 5 and older get a COVID-19 vaccine to help protect them from catching and spreading the virus.
        • The vaccine is the best way to protect children from becoming severely ill or having long-lasting health impacts. COVID-19 has become one of the top 10 causes of pediatric death, and tens of thousands of children and teens have been hospitalized with COVID-19. While children and adolescents are typically at lower risk than adults of becoming severely ill or hospitalized from COVID-19, it is still possible.

        CDC Press Release: https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2021/s1102-PediatricCOVID-19Vaccine.html

        Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for children?

        Yes. Scientists have worked to ensure the vaccine is safe for children ages 5-17. Before being authorized for children, experts completed their review of safety and effectiveness data from clinical trials. The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine was carefully tested and reviewed, and more than 11 million adolescents ages 12-17 have already received the COVID-19 vaccine. As of November 2, the Pfizer vaccine is also authorized for children ages 5-11.

        Will children experience any side effects from the vaccine? I’ve heard about myocarditis.
        • Side effects to the COVID-19 vaccines are typically mild and resolve in one to two days — like soreness in the arm, fatigue, headaches, or a slight fever.
        • The risk of a child having a reaction to the COVID-19 vaccine is very low. One rare side effect that has been linked to the COVID-19 vaccine is myocarditis (inflammation of the heart), and data show a higher risk among younger males. However, reports of this side effect are rare. The risk of developing myocarditis after a COVID-19 infection is much higher than the risk of developing myocarditis after the vaccine. If you have questions about how to protect your children from COVID-19, about the vaccines, or about myocarditis, speak to your health care provider or pediatrician.